Best Non-Toxic Crayons for Toddler Guide

best-non-toxic-crayons-for-toddler-guide
I recently started researching non-toxic crayons because Max, the toddler, loves to draw with crayons and Alexa, the baby, loves to put said crayons in her mouth.

Let’s just say I was more than appalled to learn that crayons have been a source of lead (1994), mercury (2013, Philippines), and asbestos (2000 and as recently as 2015)!

Most commercial crayons (e.g. Crayola) are made mainly from paraffin wax, which is derived from petroleum byproducts. It starts as a grayish-black sludge that is left over after the petroleum refining process, once all of the other petroleum-based products (gas, pavement, oil) have been extracted. It is then bleached and processed, both steps that require the use of toxic chemicals. Paraffin is generally considered to be non-toxic but the process of making it certainly is not!


With that being said, these are the three main waxes from natural and renewable resources that can be used to make crayons:

Beeswax – made from the honeycomb. It can be a little sticky but pure beeswax crayons smell delicious!

Soy wax – made from soybeans. Soy wax is the softest of the three waxes and may be less durable. It is also worth noting that soybean wax is likely non-GMO and may contain pesticide residue.

Carnauba wax – made from the leaves of a Brazilian palm tree. It is the hardest of the three waxes so it may be more brittle and prone to breakage.

Keep in mind that the main drawback to these natural waxes is that they will not perform as well as paraffin wax. You’re not going to be an art major drawing with these crayons. But, for babies and toddlers, they are the safest options.


List of Best Non-Toxic Crayons:

*I have short written reviews for several of the listed crayons brands that I have in my possession. These crayons were either purchased by me or gifted to me*

100% Pure Beeswax

Honey Sticks

Best Non-Toxic Crayons Guide - Honey Sticks

Honey Sticks beeswax crayons are short and stubby, perfect for little hands to practice drawing. Due to the nature of the material, they are slightly tacky and may pick up lint but they smell delicious. The colors are vibrant and glide on effortlessly. I also love their wide selection of color choices. When it’s time to draw, I find that I tend to grab these crayons first.

Ingredients: beeswax; non-toxic pigments
Origin: handmade in New Zealand

Clear Hills Honey Company

Best Non-Toxic Crayons Guide - Clear Hills Honey

These crayons are chunky and more traditionally shaped, produced by a small, family-owned business in the US that specializes in honey and beeswax-based products. I received a sample and I must say that these crayons are among my favorites. The beeswax has a subtle, sweet scent that is not overly cloying. (Although Honeysticks smell great, the scent can be pretty strong.) I also love that these crayons are wrapped so that the tackiness is less noticeable. Unfortunately, the color selection is not as diverse as I’d like and have a very “earthy” tone to them.

Ingredients: beeswax; non-toxic pigments & clays
Origin: handmade in USA

Colour Blocks

Best Non-Toxic Crayons Guide - Colour Blocks

These chunky blocks are easy to manipulate for small hands and can create a variety of lines. They are also great for shading large areas. I received a sample to try and my main concern is that the crayons did not smell sweet like beeswax. I read that beeswax can smell differently depending on the quality and how it’s processed and it just did not smell good to me.

Ingredients: beeswax; mineral pigments
Origin: handmade in USA

Other Waxes/Blends

Wee Can Too

Best Non-Toxic Crayons Guide - Wee Can Too

Wee Can Too Veggie Baby Crayons are block-shaped crayons that are completely edible and made from organic, food-grade ingredients. However, due to the nature of food-based pigments, the colors are definitely lighter and less vibrant. The soft soy wax flakes a bit more when drawing and leaves a waxy residue on the paper. I think these crayons are ideal for babies who want to be able to experiment with coloring but who might, on occasion, still sneak a nibble. These are the crayons I let Alexa eat, I mean, draw with.

Ingredients: organic soy wax; organic fruit, vegetable and mineral pigments
Origin: made in USA

Eco-Crayons

Best Non-Toxic Crayons Guide - Eco-Crayons

Eco-Kids Eco-Crayons “sea rocks” are assorted rock-shaped crayons that come in 8 colors. Due to the unusual shapes, a wide variety of markings can be created. The colors vary in vibrancy with black and brown being the boldest and green and orange being the most muted (to my untrained eye, at least.) Many of the online reviews complain about flaking and brittleness. However, I believe the crayons have since been reformulated (without carnauba wax) as I found them to be durable crayons with minimal flaking.

Ingredients: beeswax, soy wax, and stearic acid (a fatty acid that is derived from the oils of plants/animals – a.k.a. tallow); mineral pigments
Origin: handmade in USA

Crayon Rocks

Best Non-Toxic Crayons Guide - Crayon Rocks Review

Ingredients: soy wax; mineral pigments
Origin: made in USA

A Childhood Store

Best Non-Toxic Crayons Guide - A Childhood Store

Ingredients: beeswax and soy wax
Origin: handmade in USA

Earth Grown Crayons

Best Non-Toxic Crayons Guide - Earth Grown Crayons

Ingredients: soy wax; mineral or organic pigments
Origin: handmade in USA

Filana

Best Non-Toxic Crayons Guide - Filana

Ingredients: 25% organic beeswax and other natural, non-petroleum based waxes and oils, including GMO-free soy wax; organic and inorganic pigments, and kaolin clay
Origin: handmade in USA

What are your thoughts on the crayons that I have listed? Let me know if I may have missed any other great non-toxic crayon brands!

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15 Comments

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